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The New York Times has openly relished ripping down and vandalizing statues, as demonstrated by the full-page photo essay on the front of the Friday National section under the suspiciously celebratory headline “ Dumped, Painted, Toppled, Boxed Up and Hoisted Away .”

The removal or destruction of a variety of “racist” monoliths comes with the tacit approval, if not actual applause, of Times journalists. The story lumps together spontaneous mob-led removal and destruction of statues and authorized formal removals, melding them into one righteous cause, while carefully eliding the attacks and destruction of statues of universally revered figures.

The New York Times remained breezily unconcerned about the historical import. The statues have stood for more than a century in some places. Some are cast in bronze, others carved in stone. And all over the world, as protests against racism and police violence have renewed attention on legacies of injustices, people have been asking: Does this statue still need to be here? The answer from some protesters has been a resounding no. In England, a 17th-century slave trader was dumped into Bristol Harbor. In Antwerp, a Belgian king who brutalized Congo was burned and ultimately removed. And in the United States, more than a dozen statues have been toppled, including several Confederate figures. In dozens more cities, those that still stand have been marked with graffiti, challenged anew with petitions and protests, or scheduled for removal. Here’s a look at what’s happened to some of them. Interestingly, the paper led off with a racist newspaper publisher. But the bit on Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s statute in Richmond, Va. included no mention of Democratic Gov. Northam’s own past donning of racist imagery . Gov. Ralph Northam of Virginia, a Democrat , has ordered the removal of the statue under a new state […]


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